Personal information about Joseph Bunny

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Cemetery Accounts Record

The information below is derived from the Newbury Cemetery company Accounts ledgers.

Joseph Bunny
06 June 1885
Newbury
Consecrated Family Vault
E J Gardiner
 
02
019
 
On FBMD

 

 

Obituaries and Newspaper announcements

THE LATE DR. BUNNY
Article source:    Newbury Weekly News
Date of source:    11 June 1885
Copyright:    © Newbury Weekly News

Transcription:

 

THE LATE DR. BUNNY
The funeral of the late Dr. Joseph Bunny took place on Saturday last; the procession left his late residence at a quarter before two o'clock; the interment took place in Newbury Cemetery in the family vault.

The cortege consisted of hearse, three coaches and private carriages. In the first coach were Mrs Bunny, Mr. J. Brice Bunny, Miss Bunny, Miss M.E. Bunny; second coach, Miss K. Bunny, Mrs J.B. Bunny, Rev. Mr Gooch; third coach, Mr. Robert Wells, Mrs Greene, Mr. Eyles.

Three carriages next followed, containing members of the medical profession in Newbury. The first carriage Dr. Watson and Mr. R. Hickman; second carriage, Dr. Ryott and Mr. R. Birch; third carriage, Dr. Douglas and Mr. M.H. Palmer.

There were also noticed at the grave the Rev. J.G. Gibbs, Mr. Alderman Hickman, Mr. Alderman Wilson, Mr. Councillor Wintle, Mr. Councillor Knight, Mr. Richard Fisher, Mr. Basing, Mr. Cosburn etc.

 
 
 
DEATH OF DR. BUNNY
Article source:    Reading Mercury
Date of source:    06 June 1885
Copyright:    © Reading Mercury

Transcription:

 

DEATH OF DR. BUNNY
Our obituary records the death of Dr. Joseph Bunny, one of the oldest and most respected inhabitants of this town. His decease at the good old age of 86, had been anticipated for some time. The deceased gentleman, who was a member of a family which has for several generations held a leading position in the town, had an extensive practice among the families of the town and neighbourhood until a few years since when ill health compelled him to seek a well earned repose.

In his younger days Dr. Bunny took an active interest in all that concerned the welfare of the borough, figuring prominently in connection with the establishment of the Newbury Literary and Scientific Institution, and also in the formation of a local Museum, and other kindred matters.

For 35 years he held the office of borough coroner, having in 1839 succeeded Mr. Henry Hempsted, and discharged the duties with great ability until July, 1873, when he resigned. He was a magistrate for the borough, and a trustee, and for many years chairman, of Coxed and Pearce’s Charities.

In 1883 when the new scheme came into operation, he resigned his connection with that charity, and his son (Mr. J. Brice Bunny) was appointed a trustee in his stead. The deceased gentleman was also a trustee of Coxed and Pearce Charities.

He was the first hon. surgeon to the Newbury Dispensary, established in 1835, and performed the duties for ten years, after which he was hon. consulting surgeon, until the year 1877.

For some years past his health had been such as to gradually induce him to take a less active part in public matters, yet it did not prevent him from showing the same liberality towards all public institutions which had characterised him throughout his life.

By Dr. Bunny’s death, the town loses a gentleman of the strictest integrity, and one of the most kind-hearted of men.

The funeral will take place at the cemetery today (Saturday) at 2 o’clock. We are requested, on behalf of the family, to intimate that in accordance with the wishes of the late Dr. Bunny, no flowers or wreaths will be placed on the coffin.

 
 
 
THE LATE DR. BUNNY
Article source:    Berkshire Chronicle
Date of source:    06 June 1885
Copyright:    © Berkshire Chronicle

Transcription:

 

THE LATE DR. BUNNY
We regret to announce the death, on Tuesday, of Mr. Joseph Bunny, M.D.

Born in 1798, Dr. Bunny had reached his eighty-seventh year. He established himself in this town in 1823, and until his health failed in 1875, when he retired from the scene of active life, he was engaged in an extensive and lucrative practice.

In 1832 he succeeded Mr. Henry Hemsted as coroner for the borough of Newbury, the duties of which he discharged most ably and efficiently until he resigned the office, 7th July 1873, having held the appointment nearly thirty-five years.

He was also magistrate for the borough, and a trustee, and for many years the chairman of the Coxedd and Pearce’s Charities. He resigned his connection with the latter in 1883, when, on the new scheme coming into force, his son, Mr. Brice Bunny, was appointed a trustee in his place.

He was also a trustee of Kimber’s Charity. Of local institutions Dr. Bunny was a liberal and constant supporter.

The funeral of the deceased gentleman will take place at the Newbury Cemetery to-day at two o’clock.

 
 
 
THE LATE DR. BUNNY.
Article source:    Newbury Weekly News and General Advertiser
Date of source:    04 June 1885
Copyright:    © Newbury Weekly News

Transcription:

 

THE LATE DR. BUNNY.
We regret to announce the death on Tuesday last of Joseph Bunny, Esq., M.D., an event which had for some time been expected and foreseen. Born in 1798, Dr. Bunny had consequently reached his 87th year, and was a member of a family who for several successive generations have occupied a prominent position in the town of Newbury. His father and grandfather, both bearing the same christian name, were in practice in Newbury as surgeons, and so far back as the year 1766 we find the latter gentleman mentioned as a practitioner of this town, he being then in partnership with Mr. Edward Withers.

Mr. Bunny commenced his professional studies under the direction of his father; and after attending the medical schools at Guy's and St. Thomas', passed the examination of the Royal College of Surgeons in 1820; became a Licentiate of the Society of Apothecaries the same year; and in 1822, took his M.D. degree in Edinburgh. His other distinctions are thus described in the Medical Directory;—" Fell. Obst. and Med. Socs. Lond. ; Ext. Mem. Roy. Med. Soc. Edin.; Mem. Brit. Med. Assoc.” Returning to Newbury, he established himself in this town, in 1823, and until his health failed in 1882 when he retired from the scene of active life, he was engaged in an extensive and lucrative practice.

In his earlier days he sought repose from the daily routine of his official and other engagements by indulging in the pleasures of scientific culture and investigation. He pursued the study of botany with much industry, and his contributions towards a published catalogue of plants found in the neighbourhood of Newbury did much to increase and extend the knowledge previously existing on this most important subject. He must also be credited with having been one of the pioneers in promoting the establishment of the Newbury Literary and Scientific Institution, of which he was a vice-president. He expended considerable energy in the formation of a local museum, and from the date of its foundation was a member of the District Field Club.

In 1832, he succeeded Mr. Henry Hemsted (father of the late Stephen Hemsted, Esq.) as Coroner for the Borough of Newbury, the duties of which he discharged most ably and efficiently until he resigned the office, 7th July, 1873, having held the appointment nearly 35 years. He was succeeded by the late Mr. Hawkins, who was elected the following 18th July. He was also a magistrate for the borough, and a trustee, and for many years the chairman of the Coxedd and Pearce's Charities. He resigned his connection with the latter in 1883, when on the new scheme coming into force, his son, Mr. Brice Bunny was appointed a trustee in his place. He was also a trustee of Kimber's Charity, and formerly one of the hon. consulting physicians and surgeons to the Newbury Dispensary.

Although from the nature of his professional duties, and latterly from advancing years, he was unable to take a prominent part in public matters, his influence and his purse were always ready for any good work for the advantage of the town with which his name had been so long and honourably connected. It is especially deserving of mention that he was one of the most liberal subscribers in Newbury to the great scheme for effecting north and south railway communication. A strict disciplinarian, he was yet most kindly in his disposition; his conduct was always that of the courteous gentleman; he was faithful to all trusts, public and private, and a man of the most scrupulous integrity.

Death did not come to him hurriedly, but his life was brought to a close by a very gradual and general decay of the vital powers, and he has been gathered to his fathers in a good old age, "like a shock of corn cometh in in his season."

It now only remains for us to add that the funeral of the deceased gentleman will take place at the Newbury Cemetery on Saturday next, at two o'clock. We are desired on behalf of the family, to intimate that in accordance with the known wishes of the late Dr. Bunny, no flowers or wreaths will be pieced on the coffin.

 
 
 
Baby Farming In Berkshire
Article source:    Liverpool Mercury
Date of source:    24 December 1867
Copyright:    © Liverpool Mercury

Transcription:

 

Baby Farming In Berkshire
An enquiry has been held at Newbury, before Mr. Joseph Bunny, coroner for that town, and the facts elicited showed that the system of baby farming, now exciting much publication, is adopted not only in the metropolis and other large centres of population, but also in the rural districts of this country.

The inquest was held on the body of an illegitimate male child, aged seven months, who died suddenly a few days ago, at the house of a Mrs. Hamblin, living in Newbury, where illegitimate children have been received for some years past. Owing to the nature of the case the coroner determined upon instituting a searching enquiry, and accordingly every person who could give information as to the treatment the child had received was summoned to give evidence.

Sarah Ann Fryers, a fashionably attired young woman, who formerly lived in Newbury, but now resides with her friends in Gloucestershire, admitted that she gave birth to the child, and on recovering from her confinement left it in the charge of a Mrs Box, at Speen, near Newbury.

This woman, who has now three nurse children under her care, kept the child until November, when Miss Fryers gave authority for the removal of the child to the house of Mrs. Hamblin, where it died. It transpired that during the past year this woman had received four illegitimate children to nurse, and three of them had died; the parish doctor attended one of the infants, and all the children were buried in NewburyCemetery.

The coroner said it appeared to him to be very improper state of things that the ratepayers of the borough should be called upon to bear the cost of medical attendance upon illegitimate children whose mothers lived in other parts of the country. Miss Fryers took her departure from Newbury about a month ago and since that time had not seen the child, or heard from Mrs. Hamblin respecting it. The coroner said one would suppose that a mother would be anxious about her offspring, whether illegitimate or legitimate.

Dr. Ligertwood made a post-mortem examination, and Mrs Hamblin’s daughter gave evidence that she fed the deceased five times during the day and night, using arrowroot or oatmeal for its food. The coroner observed that the system of receiving illegitimate children in this way was a most vicious one, and the mortality among the infants at Mrs. Hamblin’s had been very great. The jury returned a verdict that the death of the child was occasioned by convulsions through teething, and they also expressed their opinion that the food given to the child was improper.

This obituary entry is awaiting verification.
 
 


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