Personal information about Stephen Hemsted

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Memorial Details

  Stephen HEMSTED
  10 April 1885
  82
  Male
   
  Vault covered with a large flat stone flush with ground.
  Sandstone Engraved
   
  Flat stone, top of vault: In Memory of / Eliza, Relict of the Rev. May Ellis / Rector of Ickford, Bucks. / died May 6th.1864 aged 56 years / Also Sarah, Relict of Rev. John Charles Townsend / of Newbury, Berks. / died May 10th. 1868 aged 88 years. / Also Charlotte, wife of / Lieutenant Edward Hemsted / 109th. Regiment / died December 22nd. 1868 aged 24 years. / Also of Ellen, wife of / John Whitelock, Esq. / of Owosso, Michigan, U.S.A. / died March 14th. 1870 aged 39 years. / Also Charles Hemsted / of Newbury. / died August 3rd. 1870 aged 36 years. / Also Anne, wife of Stephen Hemsted, Esq., / of Newbury, Berks. / died July 28th. 1876 aged 70 years / and was buried next to this vault on the North side. / Also Anne, wife of W.S.H. May, Esq., died March 1st.1883 aged 37 years. / Buried at Brockley Cemetery / Also Stephen Hemsted of Newbury / died April 10th. 1885 aged 82 years. / Buried on the North side of this vault. //
   
  Good but easily covered by grass. Lichen over MI in places but can be read.
  ChNW12 page 93
    The Townsend/Ellis/Hemsted family lived in Bartholomew St., Newbury. See website for obits of Eliza Ellis & her mother, Sarah Townsend. Both wives of vicars. Eliza was the wife of the Vicar of Ickford, Bucks., Rev William May Ellis, MA Christ Church, Oxon, who predeceased her. Charlotte Hemsted was the d of Henry Bursey, surgeon & general practitioner in Southwark, (buried elsewhere in NRC but grave not recorded by Mrs P.), & first wife of Lt. Col. Edward Hemsted, son of Anne & Stephen Hemsted snr., Edward is buried in St Peter's, Drayton nr Abingdon. Ellen Whitelock was daughter of Stephen & Anne Hemsted. Charles Hemsted, Ellen's brother, was a Midshipman, RN & 2nd Mate, Merchant Navy. Anne Hemsted, mother to Ellen & Charles, was the d. of Sarah & J.C.Townsend and wife of Stephen MA Oxon, MRCS, JP, surgeon, of Bartholomew St., Newbury, left £9000 to son Stephen Hemsted. She bequeathed land for the building of a meeting room for St George's, Wash Common (see FNRC website). Stephen Hemsted snr. graduated from St John's College, Oxon in 1852. Both Anne & Stephen are buried by the North side of the vault. Anne May was d. of Anne & Stephen Townsend, wife of William Simonds Higgs May, farmer, landowner & gentleman of Reading. Sources: Mrs Pattinson's records were corrected or confirmed by further inspection of the grave & by using records on ancestry uk. The place name Owosso was confirmed using Google. Anne May's burial is recorded at Brockley Cemetery https://www.deceasedonline.com/servlet/GSDOSearch.
   
  01 November 2017
  EAC
 
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Other people list on this memorial

Eliza ELLIS
Sarah TOWNSEND
Charlotte HEMSTED
Ellen WHITELOCK
Charles  HEMSTED
Anne HEMSTED
Anne MAY

Cemetery Accounts Record

The information below is derived from the Newbury Cemetery company Accounts ledgers.

Stephen Hemsted
15 April 1885
Newbury
Consecrated P G
E J Gardiner
 
02
018
 
On FBMD

 

 

Obituaries and Newspaper announcements

Stephen Hemsted
Article source:    Reading Mercury
Date of source:    18 April 1885
Copyright:    © Reading Mercury

Transcription:

 

HEMSTED.—On the 10th inst.,at Newbury, Stephen Hemsted, aged 82.

 
 
 
Stephen Hempsted
Article source:    Newbury Field Club book
Date of source:   
Copyright:    © Newbury Field Club

Transcription:

 

OBITUARY NOTICES BY WALTER MONEY, F.S.A., Hon. Sec.

THE LATE STEPHEN HEMSTED, Esq. M.R.C.S.

The names of very few persons have been so long and widely known throughout the length and breadth of the County as that of the late STEPHEN HEMSTED, Esq., whose death took place at his residence, Newbury, April 10th, 1885; and it is difficult to realise the extended and varied associations which pass away with such a man.

Mr. Hemsted sprang from an ancient family, originating amongst the Protestant refugees driven to England by the persecution of the Duke of Alva, in the sixteenth century. They first established themselves at Norwich, when they removed to Ipswich and Haverhill, in Suffolk, of which latter place one of Mr. Hemsted's ancestors was appointed Vicar in the year 1729. another branch of the family settled at Halstead in Essex, was connected by marriage with the Alstons of Saxham Hall, in Suffolk. Stephen Hemsted, surgeon of Haverhill, married in 1746, Susanna, the second daughter of Tobias Rustat, lineal descendant of Tobias Rustat, the founder of the scholarships bearing his name in the University of Cambridge, distinguished for his loyalty to the Stuarts and one of the greatest public benefactors of his age. He erected at his own expense the equestrian statues of Charles II at Windsor Castle, and Chelsea Hospital; and also the statue of James II, which still stands at the back of the Banqueting House, Whitehall.

The late Mr Hemsted, born in 1802, was the eldest son of Henry Hemsted, Esq., M.D., many years Coroner of the Borough of |Newbury; grandson of Stephen Hemsted, Esq., M. D., of Ilsley Hall, one of the coroners for the county of Berks.; and great grandson of Stephen Hemsted, Esq., surgeon of Haverhill, who married a daughter of the Tobias Rustat, above mentioned. Adopting the profession in which so many of his immediate relatives had acquired considerable distinction, Mr. Hemsted began his career as a surgeon under the eminent Dr. Abernathy, lecturer in surgery and anatomy at St Bartholomew’s Hospital. Having obtained the diploma of membership of the Royal College of Surgeons of London in 1825, he commenced practice in Newbury, and soon acquired an extensive reputation: and his success in the management of disease sustained the good name which drew so many patients to him. Fully self-reliant, he ventured to perform operations which others had declined to undertake, his skill and manual dexterity almost invariably ensuring success.

He was perhaps made of too stern materials to be a universal favourite, but few men had warmer or more devoted friends amongst those who knew him well; and his high mental culture, and inexhaustible fund of illustrative and amusing anecdotes, made him one of the most agreeable of companions. Although not a member of the Field Club, he took great interest in the objects of the Society (see Vol. II, pp.242-3), and he was at all times ready to communicate the information he had acquired on scientific and other kindred subjects during his long and active life.

He retained his physical powers almost to the last and his fine, handsome figure, although he had long passed the grand climactoric, was little changed by time: it was old age, the dying out of the lamp that had burned so clear for more than four score years, that gave him his passport through the shadowy gate to the land of rest. Sincere in his professions, neither fearing or courting the favour of any man, his name will be missed and regretted in many circles where his bright and cheery presence was ever welcome.

We may add that he married the daughter of the Rev. Charles Townsend, who predeceased him. His remains were interred in a grave adjoining the family vault in Newbury Cemetery.

 

This obituary entry is awaiting verification.
 
 
Stephen Hemsted
Article source:    Reading Mercury
Date of source:    18 April 1885
Copyright:    © Reading Mercury

Transcription:

 

STEPHEN HEMSTED

S HEMSTED, ESQ., Deceased. All persons having any CLAIMS against the ESTATE of the above Deceased are requested to forward Particulars thereof forthwith to me, the undersigned. S. HEMSTED Executor.  Newbury, April 16, 1885.

 

Sources:Reading Mercury Saturday 18 April 1885

This obituary entry is awaiting verification.
 
 
Stephen Hemsted
Article source:    Newbury Weekly News and Mrs Pattison
Date of source:    16 April 1885
Copyright:    © Newbury Weekly News

Transcription:

 

STEPHEN HEMSTED

THE LATE STEPHEN HEMSTED, ESQ.

One veteran succeeds another in going to their last home, and we by degree, yet surely, miss those venerable names which reflect alike the traditions and associations of the past, as well as the more progressive era represented in the life of the present generation. The names of very few persons have been so long and widely known throughout the length and breadth of the county as that of the gentleman whose death we regret to have to record to-day; and it is difficult to realise the extended and varied experiences which pass away with such a man.

Mr. Hemsted sprang from an ancient family, originally amongst those Protestant refugees driven to England by the persecution of the Duke of Alva, in the sixteenth century. They first established themselves at Norwich, whence they removed to Ipswich and Haverhill, in Suffolk, of which latter place one of Mr. Hemsted's ancestors was appointed Vicar in the year 1729.

Another branch of the family was settled at Halstead, in Essex, and were connected by marriage with the Alsatons of Saxham Hall, in Suffolk. Stephen Hemsted, surgeon of Haverhill', married, in 1746, Susanna, the second daughter of Tobias Rustat, lineal descendant of Tobias Rustat, the founder of the scholarships bearing his name in the University of Cambridge, distinguished for his love and loyalty to the Stuarts, and one of the greatest public benefactors of his age. He erected at his own expense the equestrian statues of Charles II at Windsor Castle, and Chelsea Hospital; and also the statue of James II, which still stands at the back of the banqueting House, Whitehall.

The late Mr. Hemsted, who was born in 1802, was the eldest son of Henry Hemsted, Esq., M.D., many years Coroner of the Borough of Newbury; grandson of Stephen Hemsted, Esq., M.D., of Ilsley Hall, one of the coroners for the county of Berks; and great grandson of Stephen Hemsted Esq., surgeon of Haverhill, who married the daughter of Tobias Rusted, above mentioned, and was the direct representative of the Rusted family. Adopting the profession in which so many of his immediate relatives had acquired considerable distinction, Mr. Hemstead began his career as a surgeon under the eminent Dr. Abernethy, lecturer in surgery and anatomy at St. Bartholomew's Hospital. Having become duly qualified he commenced practice in Newbury, and soon acquired an extensive reputation and his success in the management of disease sustained the good name which drew so many patients to him. Fully self-reliant, he ventured to perform operations which others had declined to undertake, his skill and manual dexterity almost invariably ensuring success. He was perhaps made of too stern materials to be a universal favourite, but few men had warmer or more devoted friends amongst those who knew him well; and his high mental culture, and inexhaustible fund of illustrative and amusing anecdote, made him one of the most agreeable of companions. Of his qualities as a sportsman little need be said

" Oh! ye who knew his healthful day

And saw him make triumphant way

O'er frowning fence, o'er hill and dale,

Saw him the swollen Nook assail:

And with what ease he cold efface

The various obstacles of Chase,

Say—Who could beat him in its race':"

He retained his physical powers almost to the last, and his fine, handsome figure, although he had long passed the grand climateric, was little changed by time- it was old age, the dying out of the lamp which had burned so clearly for more than fourscore years that gave him his passport through the shadowy gate to the land of rest. Sincere in his professions, neither fearing nor courting the favour of any man, his name will long survive in the memory of his friends; and he will be missed and regretted in many circles where his bright and cheery presence was ever welcome.

We may add that Mr. Hemsted married the daughter of the Rev. Charles Townsend, who pre-deceased him. Mr Hemsted was buried yesterday (Wednesday) in a grave adjoining the family vault in Newbury Cemetery.  The ceremony was conducted by the Rector of Newbury. The mourners included Mr. Stephen Hemsted, Lieut -Col. Hemsted, Rev. J. Hemsted, Vicar of Ickford, Mr. Charles Witherington, Mr. E, Mecey, Mr. E. Mecey, jun., Mr. J. C. Wells, Mr. C. P  Darke, ect , whilst amongst those wbo assembled to pay a last mark of respect to Mr. Hemsted, were Capt. Slomack, Capt. Ricardo, Alderman Hickman, Mr. Walter Money, F S.A., Rev. F. C. Gosling, Rev. C. A Johnson, Dr. Ryott, Mr. R. Hickman, Mr. F. Gill, &c.

The funeral was conducted by Messrs. Badman and Jones.


There follows an account of his father, also Stephen Hemsted.

Newbury Weekly News 16 April 1885 Mrs P p93 Ch NW 12

This obituary entry is awaiting verification.
 
 
Stephen Hempsted at theOtter Hounds NWN 2 march 1885
Article source:    NWN
Date of source:    02 April 1885
Copyright:    © 

Transcription:

 

Just a couple of weeks before his death he was at a meet of THE OTTER HOUNDS the reporting of which gives a strange feel of the times.

On Friday, the 27th March, the meet was at First Bridge. Throwing off here, the hounds at once got on a line close to Mr.Hemstead’s fishery, and so good was the scent, no one could keep pace with them; this they hunted up the meadows to opposite Benham; where the scent grew worse. No doubt we had been running heel-way, but the ' master decided to go on, and a fresh line was picked up in the next meadows; this they ran to ground in some strong earths near to Hamstead Fishery. The hounds and terriers marked well, but no amount of stamping or digging would induce him to bolt; he evidently knew where he was safe; so after an hour-and-a-half in fruitless effort we left him, and tried up to the Wilderness; but not meeting with anything here, and the day getting late, home was the word. Amongst the company present we noticed several ladies, also Sir Richard Sutton, Bart., Mr. E. Sutton, Hon. A. Dawson, Mr. Fellowes, Capt. Ward, Mr. S. Hemsted, &c , &c.

Tuesday, 31st, at 8 am , saw Mr. Clift and the hounds at Midgham station. A brilliantly fine morning brought up a goodly company, amongst whom we noticed Mr. A. S. Burr, Capt. Ward, and a party of ladies, Mr. N. Gardiner, Mr C. Fane, Mr. Hiscock, Mr. Shuter, Mr. King, Mr. W Graham, Mr. A. C. Bazett, Mr. Belcher, Capt. Fowler, Mr. D. Strange, Mr. G. Crow, &c., &c. Commencing operations near to Mr. Kearsley's Mill, we tried up the Arborne stream, where we had such a good run the week before; but nothing being met with to induce us to try any further ' up this stream, a move was made across country, past Brimpton Manor-farm to Brimpton Mill on the Kennet. Trying up what is called the Backstream, the hounds made a beautiful mark in a strong drain ; "Jack " was sent on an exploring expedition, and soon introduced us to an enormous otter, which bolted up stream in view of the whole field. Now the fun began, which for the next two hours was fast and furious. A strong line was formed across the stream to prevent his getting down into the deep water below, and eager eyes watched from both sides of the river bank to get a view. After hunting him up and down for some time, he tried a trip out on land but finding that was not going to pay, returned to his native element. The otter now began to show himself oftener, and the hounds getting more settled to their work, dusted him about in good style; going up stream, he found the water too shallow for safety, so doubled back and made a desperate attempt to get past the line, which he succeeded in doing, in spite of the most determined opposition. He was now in deep muddy water, with hollow banks and strong tree roots, where, had he remained, he could have defied all the hounds in England; but once off, he seemed determined to go on, and went right down into the main stream of the Kennet. Here the hounds got on grand terms with him, giving him no rest, and going over a shallow he was tailed by Mr. Cook, but the hounds pulled him away, and be again slipped off with deep water, and for a short time he was lost to sight, but " Furrier" made a beautiful find behind some camp sheeting where he had taken refuge, and again he went off into the boiling white water that flows over the tumbling bay. This seemed to take it out of him, and coming up close to the hounds, on the lower shallow he was tailed by Alfred (the first whip), but he was such a strong fellow he had little chance to bold him. The master now went to the rescue, and getting him firmly by the tail he was dragged out on the greensward and worried, which was not accomplished before the hounds had been severely punished. He proved to be a very large dog otter, 44 inches long and 24Ibs. weight. Mr. Clift received many and hearty congratulations on this his first kill in these parts, and he is encouraged to hope that although the rivers are so deep and strong, this will not be the only one that will cry peccavi to the perseverance and pluck in hunting such a very difficult country.

This obituary entry is awaiting verification.
 
 

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