Personal information about Rose Emma Dolton

Below is all the information we have about Rose Emma Dolton. As far as we know, the information is correct. However, if you find any errors or have additional information, certificates or pictures, please contact us so that we can update this page. Thank you.


Burial Information

Name on burial register:
   Rose Emma Dolton
Burial register image
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Age at death:
   67
Date of burial:
   07 April 1922
Abode at death:
(according to burial register)
   2 Bathwick Terrace, Bath
Burial register information:
  
Book number: 1917
Page number: 066
Record number: 10128
Official at burial:
   T.W. Beck
     
Source of information:
  Burial Register

Memorial Details

No memorial information available at this time.


 

 

Obituaries and Newspaper announcements

Rose Emma Dolton
Article source:    Newbury Weekly News and Mrs Pattison
Date of source:    06 April 1922
Copyright:    © Newbury Weekly News

Transcription:

 

MISS ROSE DOLTON

DEATH AT BATH

A PIONEER OF THE WOMEN’S MOVEMENT

 

A notable townswoman has passed away in the person of Miss Rose Dolton, who may be truthfully described as the pioneer of Newbury women who have entered public life. In the early days, like all pioneers, they had to endure a good deal of ridicule, and many rebuffs, but latterly they have come into their own. The years of the war set the seal on their success, and now it is recognised on all hands that no public authority can properly carry out its duty without its complement of women members. The Newbury Town Council at present stands by itself, but the time will come, and even they have recognised the principle by co-opting women on their committees.

It is close upon 30 years ago since women were first elected to the Newbury Board of Guardians. They were a sturdy trio, Miss Dolton, Miss Talbot and Miss Henry. At that time the destitute children lived in, and there was no more pathetic sight than to see the little Oliver Twist and his brothers and sisters stand up to make obeisance to the Guardians when they came round on Board days to visit the children. The ladies soon turned the Workhouse topsy-turvy. They boarded the children out; they did away with pauper nursing; and they put the Infirmary in decent order. By their advice, they made it possible to save considerable sums on the dietary by the adoption of economical instead of extravagant methods. They introduced the Brabazon scheme, and secured other improvements which tended to economy, efficiency, the amelioration of the lot of the inmates, and the comfort of the nurses and officials. They did not damn the woman who came to the Board with her love child, but did what they could to help her. In all this good work, Rose Dolton was a leading spirit, and it remains a standing epitaph to her memory.

Rose Emma Dolton came of an old Newbury family, which has served the town honourably for generations. She was the daughter of the late Alderman Henry Dolton, and her grandfather started the well-known business which is carried on under that name, as far back as 1792. As a young woman she was one of the best sopranos that the town has ever produced. Her voice was of a wonderful quality, and she could fill the Corn  Exchange with it, but, singing when she had a cold, she killed it, and to her great regret and that of her friends its power never returned. The Doltons were staunch Wesleyans, and it was her training in connection with the Church she loved that paved the way for her future public work. She may be said to be a pioneer of women lay preachers, for after her father’s death she took some of the services he had been in the habit of conducting. From her father also, she inherited a wonderful capacity for business. This was apparent to those who knew her in her prime as a member of the Guardians. It was also recognised by her Church, for they appointed her in the important position of Circuit Steward, the only woman in the Newbury Circuit who has held that post. Next to her Church, the temperance cause came first in importance. It was nothing to her if she was unpopular, she stood her ground, and for years she was a leader in the British Women’s Temperance movement. In all social movements she took her part. Latterly the strong will and the determination of purpose have been visibly impaired by an insidious illness. She has had paralysis of the throat. Her suffering has been great, but she has endured it with fortitude. She died on Monday at Bath, where she had been under treatment. Like all prophets in their own country, her worth has not been recognised by the multitude. But she had gone to her rest with the knowledge that she has served her day and generation well.

Newbury Weekly News 6 April 1922

Mrs. P. Code S29  Page 9.

She died on 3 April 1922 aged 67 and buried on 7 April 1922.

The gravestone inscription includes her parents Henry Dolton (1823-1899) and Emma Dolton (1826-1901); two brothers Frederick William Dolton (1856-1857) and Herbert George Dolton (1859-1864); her sister Edith Dolton (1866-1942) and her cousin Martha Jane Thomas (1842-1918)

 

 

This obituary entry is awaiting verification.
 
 

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Rose Dalton
Rose Dalton

 



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