Personal information about William Buckeridge

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Cemetery Accounts Record

The information below is derived from the Newbury Cemetery company Accounts ledgers.

William Buckeridge
03 January 1890
Newbury
Consecrated Private Grave
Reverend R Dunn
 
02
047
 
On FBMD

 

 

Obituaries and Newspaper announcements

William Buckeridge
Article source:    Newbury Weekly News
Date of source:    02 January 1890
Copyright:    © Newbury Weekly News

Transcription:

 

WILLIAM BUCKERIDGE

WILLIAM BUCKERIDGE died 30th December 1889

Buckeridge, the late Town Crier, is dead, and with him disappears another link with the past, of which he was so typical a representative.  For the greater part of his life Buckeridge has been the very embodiment of municipal authority, whether as a member of the old borough police force, of which he is almost the sole survivor; or as one of the town sergeants bearing aloft his mace at many a civic ceremony; or in the more familiar character of town crier, when his stentorian lungs were at the service of all and sundry, and, in the words of the local poet, announced -

“Lost purses, concerts, straying dogs, fish fresh to sell,
New showmen come to town, - what news he had to tell!”

Buckeridge, who succeeded the well-known Beck, as crier, was a very obliging and courteous officer, with a civil word for all whom he met.

Some ten or eleven years ago the Corporation thought fit to dress Buckeridge in something of the costume of the ancient parish beadle, of which the three-cornered hat was a distinguishing characteristic. Buckeridge came in for a good deal of chaff when he first made his appearance in this unique attire, and the poet above quoted published in the columns of the Newbury Weekly News a poem on “The new civic head-piece.”  Here is a specimen verse:-

“Oh honoured then, thrice honoured, the three-cornered hat,
Which with new dignity surmounts the functionary that
In full-blown grandeur of municipal attire,
Scarce can we recognise our friend the old Town Crier.
Never in Newbury’s palmy days of yore, I ween,
Was head-piece so imposing in its fashion seen.”

***
But the three-cornered hat did not exist for long, and Buckeridge went back to the more sober top hat with gold lace.  

Of later years his natural force abated, and he was obliged to resign his office to a younger and more energetic man.  But the Corporation showed their appreciation of his services by giving him a pension, and he was also elected to an almshouse in which he peacefully ended his days at a ripe old age.’

Newbury Weekly News 2nd January 1890.


His death announcement says he died at Church Almshouses aged 67
Mrs. P quotes his age on his tombstone as 77


-----

 

Sources:Newbury Weekly News 2nd January 1890

This obituary entry is awaiting verification.
 
 
William Buckeridge
Article source:    Newbury Weekly News and General Advertiser
Date of source:    02 January 1890
Copyright:    © Newbury Weekly News

Transcription:

 
WILLIAM BUCKERIDGE

BUCKERIDGE AND THE TOWN CRIER’S HAT

From William Buckeridge’s 1890 obituary were read ….
 
“Some ten or eleven years ago the Corporation thought fit to dress Buckeridge in something of the costume of the ancient parish beadle, of which the three-cornered hat was a distinguishing characteristic. Buckeridge came in for a good deal of chaff when he first made his appearance in this unique attire,”
 

So what was all that about?  Let’s backtrack.  The following is an extract from the minutes of the second item on the agenda of a Newbury Corporation special meeting held on Tuesday 4th February, 1879
This obituary entry is awaiting verification.
 
 
William Buckeridge
Article source:    Newbury Weekly News and General Advertiser
Date of source:    06 February 1879
Copyright:    © Newbury Weekly News

Transcription:

 
WILLIAM BUCKERIDGE
 
THE TOWN CRIER’S CLOTHING
 
The Mayor said that Buckeridge had shown him his garments, which were very much worn, and asked that he might be furnished with proper clothing.
Ald. LUCAS - We pay Buckeridge 7s. a week, what service does he render?
THE TOWN CLERK - None.
Mr. DOLTON - If Buckeridge is of any service he ought to be clothed properly …. The town crier (of Hungerford) is quite ornamental and puts others to the shade. 
….
Mr. JOHNSTON* suggested that he should have a cocked hat (laughter).
Mr. J.C. FIDLER said he should like to know what Buckeridge’s duties really were.
THE DEPUTY-CLERK - He is your town crier. 
….
M. DOLTON moved and Mr. WITHERS seconded the motion that Buckeridge be supplied with clothing.
Mr. JOHNSTON - And instead of the old chimney-pot let him have a cocked hat (laughter).
The proposal to supply him with clothing was carried, the other details to be left to the Mayor.
 
Thursday 06 February 1879   Newbury Weekly News and General Advertiser
 
[*  By the way, it was Mr. Johnston who, in his year of Mayoralty1883 instigated the Mayor’s chain.]


No further mention is made in the Newbury Weekly News of the clothing until 24th April, 1879:-
This obituary entry is awaiting verification.
 
 
William Buckeridge
Article source:    Newbury Weekly News and General Advertiser
Date of source:    24 April 1879
Copyright:    © Newbury Weekly News

Transcription:

 
WILLIAM BUCKERIDGE
 
THE TOWN CRIER is now to be seen full fig in the new dress ordered by the Corporation, the distinguishing characteristic of which is the cocked hat, recalling the memory of this important functionaries of bye-gone days - the parish beadles.
 
On presenting himself in his unique investiture in the Market on Thursday, Buckeridge came in for considerable compliment and humorous admiration from his numerous agricultural friends.
 
 
On the next page a rhyme appears and follows in full at the foot of this article.

So no wonder that our Crier came in for "a good deal of chaff when he first made his appearance in this unique attire", and quickly "went back to the more sober top hat with gold lace."
 
BS 01/21
 
 
 
THE NEW CIVIC HEADPIECE
 
Behold the glories of our Crier's new cocked hat! 
O, spectacle of grandeur! such as surely never sat 
Upon the brow of heroes of the olden time. 
Brave veterans on tented fields or ocean brine, 
Nelson, Napoleon,—Wellington, and Blucher, two 
Familiar now by full-length boot or highlow shoe!
 
O hat triangular! a sight for this degenerate age, 
When billycocks, and wideawakes, and caps are all tha rage 
From parson down to ploughboy! e'en policemen long have dropped 
The familiar chimney pot so hard and shiny topped; 
Fierce visaged bearskins to Glengarry caps give place, 
And of its wonted terrors rob the military face! 
 
Nay, rather would we turn to view the welcome sight, 
Our brand-new Fire Brigade, with brazen helmets bright, 
Prompting the thought of future brave heroic deed 
With fire engine and fire escape in time of direct need! 
 
Who dares to say indeed, a headpiece cannot speak ? 
Where, shorn of crested helm would be the classic Greek? 
Where, too, if wigs were doffed, would dwell our judges' sapient wit? 
How would the noble savage, minus his tufted scalp, for war be fit ?
 
Oh honoured then, thrice honoured, the three-corned hat 
Which with new dignity surmounts the functionary that 
In full-blown grandeur of municipal attire, 
Scarce can we recognize our friend the old Town Crier!
Never in Newbury's palmy days of yore, I ween, 
Was headpiece so imposing in its fashion seen! 
 
Talk to me not of Mayor's and Corporation's robes, 
Of priestly copes and chasubles and albs and stoles, 
How feebly do these spread a wondering awe around 
Compared with the three-cornered hat which now has crowned 
Our bellman's pericranium in glories that outshine 
The pomp of courtly heralds in the olden time!
 
Now at the silver tinkle of that well-known bell, 
Silence! ye small boys! yelping curs, farewell! 
Ye German bands, shut up! ye engines, shut off steam! 
Ye bicyclists, dismount! organs be mute! let no one dream 
Of interrupting by hoarse shouting or irreverent chat, 
The message issuing from stentorian lungs beneath that hat!
  
Lost purses, concerts, straying dogs, fish fresh to sell, 
New showmen come to town,—what news he has to tell! 
Never, except perchance in columns of the Weekly News
Is such variety of speech, to interest or amuse: 
And now secure from ever falling dull or flat, 
By the enlivening presence of the new three-cornered hat!
 
Oh honour to our Councillors, who thereby did desire 
To dignify the Borough in the person of the Crier! 
Long may he wear his hat, long may he ring his bell, 
Long may he walk about with bills, and stick them up as well! 
And may the traders of the town wax prosperous and fat, 
Bearing their heads aloft, as though each wore just such a hat! 
 
W.

This obituary entry is awaiting verification.
 
 
William Buckeridge
Article source:    Newbury Weekly News
Date of source:    09 January 1890
Copyright:    © Newbury Weekly News

Transcription:

 
WILLIAM BUCKERIDGE

BUCKERIDGE’S BUSINESS
 
 
WHISPERS FROM SPEEN. 
 
The late William Buckeridge, for many years town crier of Newbury, of whose death mention was made last week, was in his early life connected with the parish of Speen, and used to attend Speen Church. He had a brother also, who at one time kept a baker's shop where Mrs. Cooke now lives in Nortbbrook-street, and who married a daughter of a former landlord of the "Hare and Hounds" Inn, Speen. 
 
The late "crier," 50 years ago in conjunction with a Mr. Purton , carried on the business of butcher and poulterer in the Broadway, Speenhamland, in the house now occupied by Mr. Attewell, seed man, &c.; the shop then being larger than now as the passage between it and the sadler's was only wide enough to admit foot passengers.  The meat and poultry show of Messrs. Purton and Buckeridge at Christmas 1839, was generally considered to be as prettily arranged as any in town; a better effect being produced than at some of the larger shops.
 
A verandah covered with holly and ivy, and interspersed with mistletoe, had been built from beneath the upstairs windows over the pavement to the kerbing, beneath which, in addition to the usual tempting display of Christmas fare, there was arranged a variety of stuffed specimens of the furred and feathered tribes.  On the facia boards over the shop windows, which windows were not so high up as now, the specimens looked, as ’twas said, “as natural as life.”
This obituary entry is awaiting verification.
 
 
William Buckeridge
Article source:    “Newbury Borough Police: 1836-1875
Date of source:    01 January 1875
Copyright:    © as above

Transcription:

 
WILLIAM BUCKERDIGE

BUCKERIDGE & THE POLICE

In his book “Newbury Borough Police: 1836-1875", the late Richard Godfrey makes six brief references to William Buckeridge.
 
These start with: “Later that year (1852) William Buckeridge was appointed as a Night Patrol Officer.”

Until: “On 17 January, 1872 one of the Night Constables, William Buckeridge, was appointed Town Crier and Bill Poster for which he would be paid seven shillings per week and would perform general Police duties for at least four hours each day. (One assumes that he was paid an additional sum for his time spent on Police duty.) …. These changes were brought about by the sudden death of Pc. Beck on 9th January 1872.  Pc. Beck had held the office of Town Crier, Bill Poster and Bellman since the formation of the Force.”

We are grateful to Dick Godfrey who, before his passing, gave the Friends consent to freely use material from his book.
This obituary entry is awaiting verification.
 
 

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William Buckeridge
Gravestone at Newtown Road Cemetery, Newbury
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William Buckeridge

 



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