Personal information about Edward Harper Titchmarsh

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Burial Information

Name on burial register:
   Edward Harper Titchmarsh
Burial register image
Click image to enlarge
Age at death:
   73
Date of burial:
   07 May 1935
Abode at death:
(according to burial register)
   15 Chesterfield Road, Newbury
Burial register information:
  
Book number: 1917
Page number: 187
Record number: 11089
Official at burial:
   John Wilding
     
Source of information:
  Burial Register

Memorial Details

No memorial information available at this time.


 

 

Obituaries and Newspaper announcements

Edward Harper Titchmarsh
Article source:    Herts and Cambs Reporter & Royston Crow
Date of source:    24 November 1882
Copyright:    © as above

Transcription:

 

EDWARD HARPER TITCHMARSH

JOHN STREET YOUNG MEN’S MENTAL IMPROVEMENT SOCIETY -  On Friday last an essay was delivered by Mr. Ed. H. Titchmarsh, of New College, London, on “Novel Reading”.  There was a very large attendance of the members and friends of the Society.  The essay was followed by an interesting discussion, after which the Rev. J. Adams presented Mr. Titchmarsh, on behalf of the Society, with Dr. Geikie’s Life of Christ, and Canon Farrar’s Early Days of Christianity.  The works contained the following inscription: “ Presented to Mr. Edward H. Titchmarsh, by the Members of the John St. Mental Improvement Society, Royston, on the occasion of his entering the ministry, as expressive of the esteem in which he has been held, and in recognition of the valuable services which, during many years, he has rendered to their Society.  Joseph Adams, President.  Nov. 17, 1883”.

This obituary entry is awaiting verification.
 
 
Edward Harper Titchmarsh
Article source:    Reading Mercury - Newbury Herald Section
Date of source:    06 June 1903
Copyright:    © Reading Mercury

Transcription:

 

EDWARD HARPER TITCHMARSH

THE PASSIVE RESISTANCE MOVEMENT

Much interest was evinced at a meeting held in the Lecture Hall on Thursday evening, to explain the principle of passive resistance which has recently come so much to the fore in connection with the education question.  The large room was filled to overflowing, and much enthusiasm was displayed.  It may be explained that the portions of the Education Act to which Nonconformists are so much opposed will not affect our own town, as there is ample provision for the religious instruction of the children in whatever direction it may be desired.  But it is pointed out that in many thousand parishes there is only a Church school, where children will be under the instruction of Church teachers, and it is for a principle the Nonconformists are fighting.  Addresses were given by the Revs. R. Foster Jeffrey, of London, R. H. Sewell, of Reading, and E. H. Titchmarsh (who presided), explanatory of the principle of passive resistance and a resolution expressive of sympathy with the movement was unanimously adopted on the motion of the Rev. G. J. Knight, seconded by Mr. J. H. Thompson.

 

This obituary entry is awaiting verification.
 
 
Edward Harper Titchmarsh
Article source:    Berkshire Chronicle
Date of source:    10 October 1903
Copyright:    © Berkshire Chronicle

Transcription:

 

EDWARD HARPER TITCHMARSH

                                                               Passive Resisters at Newbury

                                                             Magisterial Strategy Successful

 

At the Newbury Borough Bench yesterday, before the Mayor (Mr. J. N. Day), Mr. J. Rankin, and Mr. Joseph Elliott, the Court was crowded with Passive Resisters and their friends, a good number of them being females.  There were no less than 36 summonses to be heard of this class.

The Mayor said the Bench suggested that all the cases be taken en bloc, but if any of the defendants wished to make any remarks, within reasonable limits, they would be heard.  The Bench wished to remark that that Court was not a place for demonstration, and he felt they would all respect that view.  It was a painful matter for the Bench to see such a number of the respectable inhabitants before them; still, it was their duty to adjudicate.  They were not responsible for the law, but it was their duty to see it carried out.

In answer to Mr. Burrows, Mr. Freeman said that the permission for proceedings was signed by Messrs. C. Stradling and W. Edwards, overseers.

Mr. Burrows:  Two is not a majority of four; he claimed there would be a majority.

Mr. Pettifer, the Clerk, ruled that one overseer could take proceedings.

The defendants’ names were then read out by the Clerk and the amounts. They were as follows:-

W. R. Allee, 3s. 4d.;  J. W. Righton, 9s.;  C. H. Burrows, 6s.;  J. T. Nash, 12s.;  A. Smith, 8s.;  S. A. Hewell, 11s.;  E. Chivers, 11s.;  Rev. J. Neville, 4s. (Primitive Methodist);  R. R. Elliott, 5s.;  W. Clare Gale, 7s.6d.;  A. C. Bishop, 13s. 9d.;   R. Bell, 7s.;  F. Gibbons, 2s. 8d.;   S. Seward, 13s. 10d.;  T. W. Turner, 8s.;  Rev. George Knight, 3s. 10d. (Baptist);  T. Woodward, 11s. 6d.;  Joseph Botley, 2s.;  E. F. Flint, 1s. 7d.;  J. Steptoe, 2s.;  J. Willis, 2s. 1d.;  C. Attewell, 3s. 10d.;  F. Gayter, 3s. 8d.;  Jesse Nash, 3s. 8d.;  F. C. Gibbons 4s.; T. Turner, 3s. 2d.;  E. Midwinter, 2s. 4d.;  James Liney, 3s. 11d.;  Rev. E. H. Titchmarsh (Congregational), 5s.;  R. Dolton, 5s. 7d.;  W. Bridgeman, 3s. 2d.;   G. Ashdown, 10s.;  N. M. Toomer, 18s.;  John Wyse, 3s. 1d.;  C. Midwinter, 9s. 10d.;  James Miller, 3s.

The Rev. E. H. Titchmarsh, who is President of the Newbury Citizens League, congratulated the Bench upon the order of the proceedings, and the manner in which they had outlined the business.  For himself, in refusing to pay this rate for education, he was not objecting to pay for education under an efficient and just system.  He regarded this system as profoundly unjust, and as invading his deepest religious convictions.  The doctrines taught in some of those schools he considered wer profoundly untrue.  His whole life and ministry were opposed to them.  He felt the system, too, wrought evil, by creating a religious test for teachers, and Nonconformist teachers were shut out of the highest positions in many cases.  Religious tests everywhere had done evil and harm to the soul and conscience.  It was against the harm to the soul that he protested that morning.  There was also a constitutional aspect which good citizens ought to protect against.  The manner and the spirit in the placing of this Act he considered a violation of the constitution of the country, and by it the liberty of the citizens of the country was at stake.

Mr. George Ashdown, Mr. T. W. Turner, Rev. G. Knight, Mr. Righton, Mr. Bishop, Mr. Elliott, Mr. Burrows, Miss Dolton and others briefly spoke their respective protest.

The Mayor, after the speaking had concluded, said; “Our decision can only be in one manner.  We purpose to issue one warrant, as the cases have been taken en bloc, and which will save £4 in the expenses.  The warrant would be issued to include all the cases that morning.

The Rev. E. H. Titchmarsh said he need not again thank the Bench for their courtesy and manner of dealing with the proceedings.

 

 

This obituary entry is awaiting verification.
 
 
Edward Harper Titchmarsh
Article source:    Berkshire Chronicle
Date of source:    07 November 1903
Copyright:    © Berkshire Chronicle

Transcription:

 

EDWARD HARPER TITCHMARSH

Passive Resistance Sale at Newbury

The public auction for the sale of the goods taken in the cases of Passive Resisters in the Borough was held in the Temperance Hall yesterday at 12.30.  There was a good company present.  Mr. A. W. Neate was the auctioneer.  The sale commenced with a piece of interrogative pleasantry.

Mr. Elliott:  Have you any catalogues you can let us have, Mr. Neate?

Mr. Neate:  No; but I shall be able to let you know the lots in which you are interested.

Mr. Elliott:  Have you a revolver?  (laughter)

Mr. Neate: No; but I have a sharp-shooter – in my mouth (laughter)

The auctioneer then went on to say that before he brought on the formal business, he would like to make some explanation as to his own position in this matter.  He did not believe in the Education Act any more than the Passive Resisters (hear, hear).  He had refused to sell things at Hungerford when asked by the police.  But circumstances altered cases.  Someone came to him and suggested that it might be as well if he would undertake this sale and give them his services (hear, hear), that the business might be carried out with as little friction and expense as possible.  Personally, he was not quite sure that that was the most effective way of protesting (hear, hear) against this “iniquitous and unconstitutional enactment (applause).  They might have let the authorities carry out the law in their own way, without the slightest facility being given them in the way they were now proceeding (hear, hear).  But still, their meeting might be an object lesson of a character by giving the lie direct to those who dubbed them law-breakers, instead of respectable and law-abiding citizens, as their Recorder had declared them to be.  The act was a “Bishop, Balfour and Vaughan compact.”  If not, why did the Archbishop of Canterbury want now to amend it? (applause).  Their conditions of sale would be few, but one was that the goods must be paid for and removed at the close of sale.”

Mr. Thompson here interrupted, and said that Mr. Rupert Dolton wanted to take a photo for “The Crusader” after the sale.

The auctioneer then sold as follows:-

“A long list of 38 lots of watches, cutlery,  chairs, books, musical instruments etc. ranging from 7s. for a lady’s watch to 18s.for a washstand”.

Mr. Lewendon purchased the whole of the articles, for which there was not a second bid, amid the applause of the audience and the clapping of hands, and cries of “Sold out!”.

The Auctioneer: That concludes the whole of the business I have with you at the present time.  Unfortunately, for the business, Mr. Lewendon is the only purchaser, and as he lives near me, we can settle matters at home (laughter).  I am much obliged to you for being so quiet and peaceable.

Mr. Lewendon explained his position.  He was very pleased to find that they allowed the sale to go off in such a pleasant way, but yet there was a certain admixture of pain with it, when they thought of the reason for all this (hear, hear).

The Rev. E. H. Titchmarsh, in acknowledging the services of Mr. Neate and Mr. Lewendon, reminded those present that the authorities asked Mr. Neate to do this; the Passive Resisters had not asked anybody to take a lenient course with them (hear, hear).  While these proceedings had been simple, quiet, and to some extent amusing, there was a serious character to it for all that (hear, hear).  The Passive Resisters would persist in this cause, whether the authorities conducted their part in a genial way or not (hear, hear).  The end would not be a bitter one for them, but a victorious one (hear, hear).  Their cause had got beyond a sneering one, as evidenced by the opinions of Mr. Winston Churchill and the Archbishop of Canterbury.  The end would be victory, abolishing tests for teachers, and the finality would be the disestablishment of the English Church (applause).

Mr. Thompson again asked the Resisters to stop behind, that a picture of them might be taken by Mr. Rupert Dolton for “The Crusader”.  Three cheers were then given for Dr. Clifford

This obituary entry is awaiting verification.
 
 
Edward Harper Titchmarsh
Article source:    Sheffield Daily Telegraph
Date of source:    05 March 1906
Copyright:    © Sheffield Daily Telegraph

Transcription:

 

EDWARD HARPER TITCHMARSH

NEW SHEFFIELD PASTOR

REV.  E.  H.  TITCHMARSH, M.A.,  FOR NETHER CHURCH

 

For a central church to be without a regular minister for nearly two years is a very rare event in these alert and go-ahead days.  This has been the experience of the Nether Congregational Church, Sheffield, the pastorate of which has been vacant since the Rev. James Haigh preached his farewell sermon on the first Sunday in May, 1904.  There is, however, an ample explanation for this delay: and there is no reflection of supineness or inertia upon the Church, which has all along been fully alive to the responsibility.  It has to be remembered that Nether is an old and historic Church – the parent, in fact, of local Congregationalism – and occupying this foremost position, it was natural that in the selection of a pastor the wider interests of Congregationalism as a whole should be taken into account, as well as the Church’s more immediate wants.  Hence the delay.  Preachers of note are not to be had every day, and the Church found that the time was not propitious for obtaining one of the men whose names are household words in Nonconformist circles.  But a minister has at last been secured who comes with the highest recommendations from the leading authorities – and who is, in fact, looked upon as a preacher who only requires a suitable sphere in which to develop himself.

As already announced in the “Telegraph”  this is the Rev. E. H. Titchmarsh, M.A., of Newbury, Berks. Who will commence his ministry on Sunday, March 25.  Mr. Titchmarsh was educated at New College, London.  While there he obtained his degree of M.A. of London University, and had a brilliant scholastic career, practically carrying everything before him.  At one time there was a hope that he would take up a professorship, and devote himself solely to the preparation of students for ministerial work.  But in 1888 he accepted a call to the Erith Congregational Church.  Eight years later he went to Newbury, which pastorate he at present holds.

Some information respecting his work there will be interesting as affording an indication of his qualifications for taking up an important city charge.  The membership of his present church numbers something like 200.  In addition to this, four country churches in the district are kept going, and he has the assistance of seven lay preachers whom he has trained.  Mr. Titchmarsh is a close Biblical student, and his week-night Bible class is one of the features of Newbury life.  It is interesting to recall that last year the Mayor of the town insisted upon having one night clear every week from his civic duties in order that he should not miss this class.  Mr. Titchmarsh is accustomed to a large Sunday school, which boasts a membership of over 400, in charge of more than 50 teachers;  whilst an undenominational P.S.A., conducted by him, is a popular and well attended service.  Though he spends a good deal of time in his study, he believes in plenty of exercise.  His favourite recreations are cricket and cycling.  Locally he is known as the “Bishop of Newbury”.

As a preacher, Mr. Titchmarsh may be said, to use a paradox, to be deeply simple.  He has preached on two Sundays to the congregation at Nether, the last occasion being Hospital Sunday, when, in the morning, appropriating his discourse to the special subject of the day, he sought to show that there was a Cross of the Healer as well as a Cross of the Redeemer.  Oliver Wendell Holmes had said that every poem that was worth anything had cost the poet a considerable expenditureof vital energy at some time or other.   This was true not only of poems, but of every human thing that was really great and worth doing, that would really bless others.   The calmness and self-control, the quiet mastery of a great physician, were only attained because he had poured out his vital energy in the acquirement of knowledge of the things with which he had to deal.  Expenditure of ourselves, of our vital powers, there must be at some point or other if we are to be effective in the service of others.  He proceeded to show that this was true of the healing Redeemer, and that it was a superficial view of the Gospel which supposed that His healing works cost Him nothing.  There was a vicarious element even in the mighty works of healing.

Mr. Titchmarsh is a reasoner rather than rhetorician, a teacher as well as a preacher – a distinction that cannot always be made.  He has also a reputation as a lecturer.

In coming to Sheffield, Mr. Titchmarsh will certainly have a much larger area of activity to control and direct; but from the record of his work and his scholastic attainments, it cannot be doubted that he is eminently qualified for the pastorate that has been offered to him, and that he will make a notable addition to the Congregational ministers of Sheffield.

This obituary entry is awaiting verification.
 
 
Edward Harper Titchmarsh
Article source:    Sheffield Daily Telegraph
Date of source:    14 December 1920
Copyright:    © Sheffield Daily Telegraph

Transcription:

 

EDWARD HARPER TITCHMARSH

Appointment at Lancashire College

The Rev. E. H. Titchmarsh, M.A., who for many years was the minister at Nether Chapel, a position from which he retired a few months ago, has received a temporary appointment as resident tutor at the Lancashire College, Manchester.  Dr. Bennett, who was principal of the College, died suddenly a fortnight agao, and the Committee, in making arrangements to carry on the work, have asked Mr. Titchmarsh to assist them for one term.

This obituary entry is awaiting verification.
 
 
Edward Harper Titchmarsh
Article source:    Chelmsford Chronicle
Date of source:    19 May 1922
Copyright:    © Chelmsford Chronicle

Transcription:

 

EDWARD HARPER TITCHMARSH

NEW PASTORS AT HALSTEAD AND COLCHESTER

The Rev. E. H. Titchmarsh, M.A.., who has accepted the pastorate of the Halstead New Congregational Church was at Nether Church, Sheffield, for fourteen years.  For the past twelve months he has been assistant tutor at Lancashire College.  He was chairman of the Yorkshire County Congregational Union in 1920.  A native of Royston, Hertfordshire, the rev.  gentleman is a brother of Mr. Titchmarsh, the cricketer, who plays for the Gentlemen of England.  The new pastor is a good platform speaker, and takes a wide interest in sport, particularly cricket.  He hopes to begin his duties at Halstead on the first Sunday in July. (The rest of the article relates to the Rev. D. W. Langridge).

This obituary entry is awaiting verification.
 
 
Edward Harper Titchmarsh
Article source:    Chelmsford Chronicle
Date of source:    02 August 1929
Copyright:    © Chelmsford Chronicle

Transcription:

 

EDWARD HARPER TITCHMARSH

The Rev. E. H. Titchmarsh, M.A., for the past seven years minister of the New Congregational Church, Halstead, is retiring.  He preached his farewell sermons on Sunday, and on Monday a farewell gathering took place in the schoolroom.  Mr. A. Blomfield  presided.  The Rev. T. H. Curling, R.D., vicar of Halstead,  spoke of the amicable relations which had always existed between Mr. Titchmarsh and himself.  The Rev. P. N. Busbill, B.A., representing the Free Churches of the town and the North Street Baptist Church voiced on their behalf good wishes for Mr. Titchmarsh’s future, and Mr. J. Tyler, on behalf of the church and congregation, presented Mr. Titchmarsh with a wallet containing £50.  Mr. Blomfield asked Mr. Titchmarsh to accept a further gift of about £18, contributed voluntarily by friends outside the church and a cheque for £52 10s. from friends at Newbury (Berks.) Congregational Church where Mr. Titchmarsh ministered for ten years, and where he is taking up residence.

This obituary entry is awaiting verification.
 
 

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Edward Harper Titchmarsh
The Reverend Edward Harper Titchmarsh M.A
©Sheffield Daily Telegraph
Edward Harper Titchmarsh
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Edward Harper Titchmarsh
Titchmarsh family group
©FNRC
Edward Harper Titchmarsh

 



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